Skip to main content

ACTIVATE Program Participants

PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Sorooshian, Armin
Principal Investigator
University of Arizona
Zeng, Xubin
Deputy PI
University of Arizona
Kleb, Mary
Investigation Manager
NASA LaRC
Hair, John
Project Scientist
NASA LaRC
Ferrare, Rich
Deputy Project Scientist
NASA LaRC
Chen, Gao
Project Data Manager
NASA LaRC
Aknan, Ali
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Shook, Michael
NASA LaRC
Silverman, Morgan
NASA LaRC-SSAI
MODELING & ANALYSIS
Ackerman, Andrew
Cloud LES Modeling
NASA GISS
Bauer, Susanne
Aerosol/Cloud GCM Modeling Lead
NASA GISS
Tornow, Florian
Columbia University
Liu, Hongyu
Aerosol Modeling and Operational forecasting
NIA/NASA LaRC
Choi, Hyun-Deok
NIA
Zhang, Bo
NIA
McComiskey, Allison
Aerosol-Cloud Analysis/Modeling
BNL
Park, Minnie
BNL
O’Brien, Rachel
Aerosol Composition Analysis
College of William and Mary
Robinson, Claire
NASA LaRC – SSAI
Painemal, David
Aerosol-Cloud Analysis/Modeling
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Nguyen, Louis
NASA LaRC
Spangenberg, Doug
NASA LaRC – SSAI
Smith, Bill, Jr
Geostationary satellite Retrieval Operational Products
NASA LaRC
Sorooshian, Armin
Cloud-Aerosol analysis
University of Arizona
Aldhaif, Abdulmonem
University of Arizona
Braun, Rachel
University of Arizona
Choudhary, Yousuf
University of Arizona
Corral, Andrea
University of Arizona
Dadashazar, Hossein
University of Arizona
Edwards, Eva-Lou
University of Arizona
Gladney, Angel
University of Arizona
Gonzalez, Marisa
University of Arizona
Hilario, Miguel
University of Arizona
Lopez, David
University of Arizona
Lorenzo, Genie
University of Arizona
Ma, Lin
University of Arizona
MacDonald, Alex
University of Arizona
Mardi, Ali Hossein
University of Arizona
Schlosser, Joseph
University of Arizona
Singh, Shruti
University of Arizona
Stahl, Connor
University of Arizona
Zeider, Kira
University of Arizona
Tselioudis, George
Cloud Analysis Modeling Lead
NASA GISS
Wang, Hailong
Aerosol/Cloud Modeling (Global, LES, CRM, SCM) Lead
PNNL
Chen, Jingyi
PNNL
Li, Xiang-Yu
PNNL
Zeng, Xubin
Model evaluation and improvement
University of Arizona
Brunke, Michael
University of Arizona
Cutler, Lauren
University of Arizona
Dixon, Ross
University of Arizona
Ouyed Hernandez, Amir
University of Arizona
Zuidema, Paquita
Aerosol-Cloud Analysis/Modeling
University of Miami
Chellappan, Seethala
University of Miami
FALCON INSTRUMENTS
Anderson, Bruce
LARGE In Situ Aerosol and Cloud Measurements
NASA LaRC
Crosbie, Ewan
LARGE Cloud Water
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Diskin, Glenn
DLH and trace gas
NASA LaRC
Choi, Yonghoon
NASA LaRC – SSAI
DiGangi, Josh
NASA LaRC
Nowak, John
NASA LaRC
Moore, Rich
LARGE CCN and 1D Modeling
NASA LaRC
Thornhill, Lee
TAMMS
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Voigt, Christiane
Cloud Probes
DLR
Kaufmann, Stefan
DLR
Kirschler, Simon
DLR
Ziemba, Luke
LARGE
NASA LaRC
Brown, Matt
NASA LaRC-USRA
Robinson, Claire
NASA LaRC – SSAI
Sanchez, Kevin
NASA LaRC – USRA
Shook, Michael
NASA LaRC
Wiggins, Elizabeth
NASA LaRC – USRA
Winstead, Eddie
NASA LaRC-SSAI
KING AIR INSTRUMENTS
Cairns, Brian
RSP
NASA-GISS
Alexandrov, Mikhail
Columbia University
Herron, Alexander
Columbia University
Jones, Michael
Rochester Institute of Technology
Sinclair, Kenneth
Columbia University
Stamnes, Snorre
NASA LaRC
Van Dienenhoven, Bastiaan
Columbia University
Wasilewski, Andrzej
SciSpace
Hostetler, Chris
HSRL-2
NASA LaRC
Burton, Sharon
NASA LaRC
Chemyakin, Ed
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Clayton, Marian
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Collins, James
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Cook, Tony
NASA LaRC
Fenn, Marta
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Ferrare, Rich
NASA LaRC
Hair, John
NASA LaRC
Hare, Richard
NASA LaRC
Harper, David
NASA LaRC
Kooi, Susan
NASA LaRC – SSAI
Lee, Joe
NASA LaRC
Nehrir, Amin
NASA LaRC
Notari, Anthony
NASA LaRC
Scarino, Amy Jo
NASA LaRC – SSAI
Seaman, Shane
NASA LaRC
Shingler, Taylor
NASA LaRC
Smith, John
NASA LaRC
Thornhill, Lee
Dropsondes
NASA LaRC
Robinson, Claire
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Hock, Terry
Dropsondes
NCAR
Goodstein, Mack
NCAR
FLIGHT OPERATIONS SUPPORT
Barrick, John
Aircraft data systems, state parameters
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Shook, Michael
Operational Weather Forecasting
NASA LaRC
Scarino, Amy Jo
Operational Weather Forecasting
NASA LaRC-SSAI
Ziemba, Luke
Aircraft Logistics, Science Liasion
NASA LaRC
Wusk, Mike
Aircraft Project Manager
NASA LaRC
Baxley, Brian
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Bernth, Brian
Pilot
NASA WFF
Coldsnow, Matt
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Delaney, Luke
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Elder, Matt
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Everson, Gerrit
Pilot
NASA WFF
Jamison, Glenn
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Slover, Greg
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Stewart, Mike
Pilot
NASA LaRC
Thorson, Taylor
Pilot
NASA ARC
Yasky, Rick
Pilot
NASA LaRC/Retired
Cleckner, Craig
Engineer
NASA LaRC/Retired
Horowitz, Evan
Engineer
NASA LaRC
Howell, Charles
Engineer
NASA LaRC
Kagey, Les
Engineer
NIA/LaRC
Klassman, David
Engineer
NASA LaRC
Nowicki, Martin
Engineer
NASA LaRC
Shelton, Kevin
Engineer
NASA LaRC
West, Noel
Engineer
NASA LaRC
Brame, Matt
UC12 Mechanic
Yulista
Garber, Cecil
UC12 Mechanic
Yulista
Hennessey, Kevin
HU25 Mechanic
Yulista
Riddick, Dean
HU25 Mechanic
Yulista
Haynes, Andrew
Aircraft Mechanic
NASA LaRC
Wilz, Ted
Avionics Technician
NASA LaRC
Stephen, Kevin
Sheet Metal Technician
NASA LaRC
Garner, Angus
QA
NASA LaRC
Mielnik, John
QA
NASA LaRC
Coffey, Alton
Fab
NASA LaRC
Van Gilst, David
Data Acquisition/Chat
BAERI
Rainer, Sebastian
Data Acquisition/Chat
BAERI

University of Arizona Logo
University of Miami Logo
PNNL Logo
Brookhaven Logo
NIA Logo
SSAI Logo
NASA Logo

June 14, 2021

This past week included two double-flight days on Monday-Tuesday (June 7-8). June 7 was notable in that the second flight (RF 80) was a “process study” flight, which accounts for approximately 10% of ACTIVATE flights. We targeted an area with a cluster of clouds and conducted a total of 10 Falcon legs in cloud at different altitudes ranging from ~2 to ~13 kft. These legs and a subsequent downward spiral resulted in 10 cloud water samples for a single cloud system. Simultaneously, the King Air conducted a ‘wheel and spoke” pattern far above to allow the remote sensors to characterize the environment and cloud that the Falcon was directly sampling. A total of 14 dropsondes were launched by the King Air in the ~3 hr flight. This flight and the other “process study” flight in this summer campaign (RF77 on June 2) will provide a remarkable dataset to investigate aerosol-cloud-meteorology interactions with very detailed measurements for single evolving cloud systems.

June 7, 2021

Four successful joint flights occurred last week. The double flight day on Wednesday June 2 was particularly noteworthy. Our morning flight conducted our typical statistical survey flight plan to an area south of the Virginia coast where there was a cumulus cloud field, with some regions evolving into deeper, more organized, convection. Based on that flight and satellite imagery, we set up the second flight to execute a “process study” pattern where the Falcon conducted a series of transects through a selected cloud cluster to characterize the vertical microphysical properties of the developing cluster immediately followed by an environmental profile in the surrounding cloud-free region. Simultaneously, the King Air conducted a “wheel and spoke” pattern centered around the cloud system, with multiple dropsondes launched above, and on the periphery of the cloud cluster alongside remote sensing transects to characterize the cloud and aerosol system underneath. Data from both planes will be used to characterize the range of cloud types observed on that day, with a focus on understanding the processes that drive shallow cumulus organization.

June 1, 2021

The last two weeks were busy with 9 joint flights, including three separate double-sortie days. The May 21 morning flight in particular was intriguing with a mixture of different conditions offshore with the two aircraft flying mostly straight to the east and then returning on the same track to NASA LaRC. Closer to shore, the aircraft observed a stratus deck with a prominent aerosol layer just above cloud as observed by the HSRL-2. These clouds then transitioned progressively into a more scattered cumulus cloud field to the east. At the far eastern end of the track there was a cold pool that we sampled within and just outside. Throughout this and the other flights this past week, there was evidence both either (or both) smoke and dust in the free troposphere. Measurement data will help unravel how these various aerosol types interact with the different types of clouds such as in the May 21 flights. On May 19, we also coordinated the flight along the CALIPSO satellite track where both aircraft and the satellite had successful made measurements.

May 17, 2021

After a short break after the Winter 2021 campaign, ACTIVATE took back to the skies this past week to start the Summer 2021 campaign. We conducted 4 successful joint flights between May 13-15 with interesting cloud conditions in each flight. The lower-flying Falcon characterized multiple layers of clouds and observed both warm and mixed-phase precipitation. Remote sensing observations on the higher-flying King Air detected aerosol layers aloft in the free troposphere potentially from dust and smoke on separate flights.

April 5, 2021

ACTIVATE wrapped up its winter 2021 flight campaign with five joint research flights this past week (RF 57-61) capped off by a double-flight day on Friday (4/2) to capitalize on another cold air outbreak event. Those two flights included an increased number of dropsondes (~10 per flight) to get extensive temporal and spatial characterization of the vertical atmospheric structure as the cold air outbreak cloud field evolved during the day. Notable in the other flights last week was successful coordination with ASTER and CALIPSO overpasses in our flight region.

March 29, 2021

We executed a joint flight (RF 56) on Tuesday March 23rd on a day marked by fairly ‘clean’ conditions in terms of very low aerosol and cloud drop number concentrations in the marine boundary layer. Cloud fraction on this day was markedly lower than a typical cold air outbreak type of day, which is helpful for ACTIVATE which is aiming to generate statistics in a wide range of conditions associated with aerosols, clouds, and meteorology.

March 22, 2021

The previous week posed significant weather challenges but Saturday (March 20, 2020) did finally provide low clouds evolving in a cold air outbreak. Interesting features in that joint flight (Research Flight 55) were Asian dust residing aloft above the boundary layer clouds, in addition to an interesting layer of depolarizing aerosol right above clouds near the end of flight as observed by the HSRL-2; it is unclear what the source of that layer was, but data analysis with the Falcon data will help unravel those details.

March 15, 2021

ACTIVATE conducted four more successful joint flights (Research Flights 51-54) this past week. We characterized a variety of cloud conditions including post-frontal clouds associated with another cold air outbreak on Monday (March 8) in contrast to the following day (Tuesday March 9) where there was a sharp inversion with uniform cloud top heights and generally thin clouds. Flights this past week were marked by influence from local and regional burning emissions. The second of two flights on Friday (March 12) was coordinated with a CALIPSO overpass.

March 8, 2021

ACTIVATE executed three successful joint flights (Research Flights 48-50) this past week. On Thursday March 4th we coordinated our flight with a NASA A-Train overpass over an area with some scattered marine boundary layer clouds. The back-to-back flights on Friday March 5th served two objectives to capitalize on an excellent cold air outbreak event: (i) characterize the aerosol and meteorological characteristics upwind of the cloud field farther downwind; and (ii) characterize the evolution of the cloud field with the desire to capture the transition from overcast cloudy conditions to open cell structure. Noteworthy features in these flights were dust layers from long-range transport and significant new particle formation.

Febraury 5, 2021

ACTIVATE’s had its first joint flight of the winter 2021 campaign on February 3. We were successful to sample a transition from overcast stratocumulus clouds to broken cumulus clouds near our farthest southeast point of the flight track. There was extensive mixed-phase precipitation in areas closer to shore but pure liquid clouds farther offshore coinciding with the open cell cloud field. Although at low optical depth, an interesting aerosol layer was observed above 6 km that most likely was dust due to its depolarizing nature.

January 30, 2020

This past week ACTIVATE took to the skies again to begin our 2021 winter campaign. In contrast to last year, we started a bit earlier in the month of January to capitalize on a higher frequency of cold air outbreak events. Friday’s flights (January 29) were particularly ideal with both aircraft sampling along cloud streets aligned with the predominant wind direction coming from the north/northwest. We observed a transition from supercooled droplets to mixed phase precipitation with distance away from shore.